Do we really need our doctors to be ‘resilient’?

haddock fight tough

When we think of the word ‘resilience’ it conjures up certain meanings. ie that no matter what is thrown at you, you can ‘handle it’. That you are tough enough to take it all on, and carry on.

Increasingly there are moves to train our doctors to be more ‘resilient’ to life, but is this really what is needed?

Burnout rates in the profession are utterly staggering. Over half of the medical profession. That is correct, over half of the medical profession are burnt out. 25% of the profession have thought of killing themselves at any one point in life. That’s right. A quarter of health care professionals, those trained to be our experts in health care have found life so miserable that their only way out has been to contemplate suicide.

Our suicide rates are far higher than any other section of society, the irony not being lost here as we are health care professionals.

The levels of bullying and harassment in our profession are rife, and increasingly doctors are beginning to speak up about the stresses and strains that they are under, and in the UK in particular, they are walking off the job to move to other countries where they feel more valued.

It is clear that as a profession our health and well-being is suffering. But is aiming for increased ‘resilience’ really the answer?

The sort of people who do medical school are by nature pretty ‘resilient’. They push themselves, deny themselves all sorts of things, in order to not only get the marks required for medical school but increasingly the vast array of extra-curricular activities that are required to demonstrate and prove that one is a suitably exceptional candidate.

Circumstances in medicine are certainly arduous.…..long hours of work, study for years on end, seeing people at their worst, a well established culture of bullying and harassment….Nobody ‘survives’ unless they have a degree of ‘resilience’ to human suffering, both their own, and others 😉

As doctors, we care deeply about people and innately and through our programming in medical school we want to take away human suffering. We see it as being a bad thing. Yet we quickly realise that the time that we have and the tools that we have in our medical armamentarium are not sufficient, and are woefully inadequate in comparison to the immensity of the human suffering that we are confronted with.

There is much to process in day to day life, in conjunction with the multitude of pressures, to do with time management, clinic hours, paperwork, and on top of that our life and family demands.

Many of us burnout and there are many things that people are pointing the finger to that are causing burnout.

Some people say its long hours, but its clearly not that, as many people work long hours with no burnout. There are clearly other factors at play and we are certainly affected by and react to the toxicity of the environments that we find ourselves in.

But is ‘resilience’ really what we need and what we truly want our doctor to be? Continue reading